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Endnotes

1.   Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC), Temporary Foreign Worker Program: Labour Market Opinion (LMO) Statistics, Table 10. Available Here, (last retrieved October 12, 2010).

2.   HRSDC, supra note 1, Table 8. Available Here, (last retrieved October 12, 2010).

3.   HRSDC, supra note 1, Table 7. Available Here, (last retrieved October 19, 2010).

4.   Stefan Mantsch, “IOM Assists 1,000 Guatemalan Labour Migrants in June,” IOM Press Release, June 22, 2010. Available Here, (last retrieved October 13, 2010).

5.   See Sandra Elgersa, “Temporary Foreign Workers,” Library of Parliament, Political and Social Affairs Division, Parliamentary Information and Research Service (Doc. No. PRB 07-11E), September 7, 2007, at 3f.

6.   The other program, which places skilled workers in permanent positions, is of less concern with Global Workers, since it often refers to offers of permanent employment. See HRSDC, “Temporary Foreign Worker Program: Hiring Skilled Workers and Supporting their Permanent Immigration,” Available Here, (last retrieved November 2, 2010).

7.   Nelson Mauricio Palacio, “Integration of Low-Skilled Immigrants: The Provincial Nominee Program in Manitoba and Ontario,” Research Summary, CERIS, April 2010, Available Here, (last retrieved November 2, 2010).

8.   Andrew S. Downes and Kim Clarke, “The Canadian Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program: The Experience of Barbados, Trinidad & Tobago and the OECS,” The North-South Institute (June 2007), at 2.Available Here, (last retrieved October 12, 2010).

9.   Mark Thompson, “Migrant Workers in Canada: Emerging Policy Issues,” Institute for Work and Health (February 2009), at 2.Available Here, (last retrieved on October 12, 2010).

10.   Judy Fudge and Fiona MacPhail, “The Temporary Foreign Worker Program in Canada: Low-Skilled Workers as an Extreme Form of Flexible Labor,” 31 Comparative Labor Law and Policy Journal (2009): 5-45, at 7.

11.   Downes and Clark, supra note 1.

12.   Kerry Preibisch, “Pick-Your-Own-Labor: Migrant Workers and Flexibility in Canadian Agriculture,” 44 International Migration Review (2010): 404-441, at 412, 422ff.

13.   HRSDC, “Agreement for the Employment in Canada of Commonwealth Caribbean Seasonal Agricultural Workers—2010, Available Here, (last accessed October 13, 2010), at VIII(1); I(1).

14.   HRSDC, “Agreement for the Employment in Canada of Seasonal Agricultural Workers from Mexico—2010,” Available Here, (last retrieved October 13, 2010), I(1)(a-c).

15.   HRSDC, “Temporary Foreign Worker Program: Live-in Caregiver Program,” Available Here, (last retrieved November 2, 2010).

16.   See ibid, stating, “employers who want to hire live-in caregivers must apply to Human Resources and Skills Development Canada/Service Canada for a labour market opinion.”

17.   58 UN GAOR Supp. (No. 38) at 366, UN Document A/58//38 (2003), cited in S.A. Kahn, “From Labour of Love to Decent Work: Protecting the Human Rights of Migrant Caregivers in Canada,” 24 Canadian Journal of Law and Society (2009): 23-45, at note 67.

18.   HRSDC, “Temporary Foreign Worker Program: Changes to the Live-in Caregiver Program,” Available Here, (last retrieved November 2, 2010).

19.   CIC, “Changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program—Pilot Project for Occupations Requiring Lower Levels of Formal Training (NOC C and D),” Available Here, (last retrieved November 16, 2010).

20.   HRSDC, Temporary Worker Program: Pilot Project for Occupations Requiring Lower Levels of Formal Training (NOC C and D).Available Here, (last retrieved October 12, 2010).

21.   Fudge and MacPhail, supra note 5, at 22.

22.   Guidelines are made available through the HRSDC. Available Here, (last retrieved October 12, 2010).

23.   Fudge and MacPhail go so far as to suggest that the PP will gradually replace the SAWP. See supra

24.   Data for 2006-2009 Available Here, (last retrieved October 12, 2010); data for 2005 Available Here, (last retrieved October 13, 2010).

25.   Id.

26.   Available Here, (last retrieved October 13, 2010).

27.   See Fudge and MacPhail, supra note 5, at 34f.

28.   CIC, supra note 17.

29.   Giselle Valanezo, PhD. Diss., The Queen’s University. On file with the Global Workers Justice Alliance.

30.   Stefan Mantsch, “Ruim 5000 arbeidsmigranten uit Guatamala in Canada met hulp van IOM,” IOM Guatemala, 2008. Available Here, (last retrieved October 13, 2010).

31.   Stefan Mantsch, “IOM Assists 1,000 Guatemalan Labour Migrants in June,” IOM Press Release, June 22, 2010. Available Here, (last retrieved October 13, 2010). Valanezo, supra note 27.

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