Global Statistics

Global Migrants
In 2010, there were 214 million migrants; of these, 105 million were workers. These workers and their families make up nearly 90% of all international migrants.1

Temporary Workers
In Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) member states, composed of the 33 wealthiest world economies, temporary workers now outnumber permanent labor immigrants. In 2010, temporary migrant workers reached 2.3 million outnumbering permanent migrant workers by nearly one million.2 Between 2003 and 2007, temporary labor migration increased at an annual rate of 7 per cent in the OECD countries, making it the fastest growing form of migration.3

Women Migrants
In OECD member states, composed of the 33 wealthiest world economies, temporary workers now outnumber permanent labor immigrants. In 2010, temporary migrant workers reached 2.3 million outnumbering permanent migrant workers by nearly one million. Between 2003 and 2007, temporary labor migration increased at an annual rate of 7 per cent in the OECD countries, making it the fastest growing form of migration.4

Remittances in 20105
Migrants sent 440 billion dollars in 2010 to their families in their home countries. Remittances to the developing world (325 billion) exceed total dollars of Foreign Direct Investment. At 55 billion dollars, India receives the most remittances in the world. Remittances constitute 35% of Tajikistan gross domestic product (GDP), the highest percent of GDP in the world.

Emigration
Mexico is the source of the most emigrants in the world at 11.9 million in 2010.6

 

Click Here for Endnotes.

Publications

"Visa Pages" - U.S. Temporary Foreign Work Programs - New Edition
Updated edition of Visa Pages is now available! 
 
"Visa Pages" is a one-stop resource to find comprehensive information about the various non-immigrant visas U.S. employers use to bring temporary foreign workers from all over the world to work in the U.S. 
 
January
2017
Recruitment Rules: Countries of Employment

"Recruitment Rules: Countries of Employment" details the legal framework for international labor recruitment in four common temporary work programs - the United States nonimmigrant H-2A (agricultural) and H-2B (nonagricultural) visas, and the Canadian Temporary Foreign Worker Program and the bilateral Special Program for Agricultural Workers with Mexico and Caribbean nations.

August
2016

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