III. B-1 WORKERS IN THE U.S. – DATA

The U.S. government keeps track of individuals who are issued B-1 visas and admitted to the United States in the B-1 visa category.  However, neither the U.S. State Department nor the U.S. Department of Homeland Security breaks down that information with respect to the particular B-1 subclasses that authorize employment.  For example, from available information, it is impossible to know the number of domestic workers or trainees who have received B-1 visas.  There is no information on where they come from, or their age, or gender. Likewise, there is no available data on the number of individuals with B-1 in lieu of H-1B visas, or other demographic information.  Because the U.S. Department of Labor has no role in either of these three B-1 subclasses, that agency does not have any data pertaining to the program either.  Furthermore, no federal agency publishes information about employers of B-1 workers.  
 
 
A. Number of B-1 Visitors in the U.S.
The number of new B-1 visas issued annually has steadily declined over the last ten years, from 75,642 in 2002 to 35,341 in 2012.93
 
1. U.S. Department of Homeland Security
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has two sub agencies that may be involved in the B-1 program and thus may be sources of data. At the border or port of entry, the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) interviews workers who have received B-1 visas, decides whether to grant their admission, and issues the electronic I-94.  These admissions are tracked and data is published annually. Unlike certain other nonimmigrant work visa programs, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has no role prior to the issuance of a B-1 visa.  USCIS is involved, however, when the B-1 domestic worker applies for her Employment Authorization Document after her arrival, or when any B-1 visa holder applies for an extension of the visa.  While USCIS publishes information on EAD applications and extensions generally, the information is not disaggregated by nonimmigrant visa category. 
 
a) U.S. Customs and Border Patrol - admissions
DHS annually publishes the number of admissions of individuals with B-1 visas.94  In 2012, there were 2,972,355 admission events for individuals with a B-1 visa.95 This number is much higher than the number of B-1 visas issued by the U.S. State Department for two reasons.  First of all, each time a nonimmigrant worker enters the United States, CBP counts the entry as an admission. That is, one single individual could be counted many times if they are admitted more than once.  More importantly, however, the B-1 admissions numbers include individuals who are issued B-1 visas as well as individuals who are issued a combination B-1/B-2 visa.  DHS does not have a category for the combined B-1/B-2 visa.  Instead, the CBP inspector will decide whether to count the individual as either a B-1 business visitor or a B-2 tourist depending on questioning at the port of entry.96
 
 
 
 
B. National Origin
The Philippines was the largest sending country for B-1 visas in 2012, followed by Mexico, Venezuela, Brazil and Cuba.99  However, because the B-1 visa is not broken down into subclasses, this information tells us nothing about the nationality of individuals who are working with B-1 visas.
 
Based on admissions flow, the leading sending countries are Mexico, China, India, Brazil and South Korea.100 However, in any case, because the B-1 visa is not broken down into subclasses, this information tells us nothing about the nationality of individuals who are working with B-1 visas.
 
 
 
 

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